Liberian Kreyol language (Vernacular Liberian English), or Liberian creole the most common variety, developed from Liberian Interior Pidgin English, the Liberian version of West African Pidgin English though it has been significantly influenced by the Americo-Liberian and the Caribbean slaves Settler English. It has been analyzed having a post-creole continuum. Resources for Self-Instructional Learners of Less Commonly Taught Languages by University of Wisconsin-Madison Students in African 671 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted. The love of liberty brought us here (English) Anthem "All Hail, Liberia, Hail!" Kreyol, Liberian Pidgin English. Unlock this profile with an Essentials plan. According to wikipedia, the official language in Nigerian is English but we all know that the common language we speak in Nigeria is Pidgin. "But in fact, English was already there — the West African variety, pidgin English." 2) If the speaker knows the listener well. Useful Online Resources for Learning Acholi, Acholi: Talking Politics in Northern Uganda, Acholi & Ngakarimojong: Lost in Translation, Introductory Lesson on Greetings in Akan Twi, Introducing yourself and meeting others in Akan Twi, Food & Drinks in Amharic: Basics of Ethiopian Food, Cultural Resources for Learning About the Middle East. Singler (1982) notes that there five factors that influence how and when an individual uses a particular variety. Kreyol (Liberian Pidgin English, Vernacular Liberian English) is an English-based pidgin spoken in Liberia. Hancock (1971) and Singler (1982) refer to these varieties as “idealizations” seemingly borrowing from Weber the notion of “ideal type.” The use of each variety is partly based on context or occasion, though not everyone would use that variety within each specific context. Liberia was founded in 1822 as a settlement for freed slaves from the US, and was proclaimed independent in 1847. With the end of the British colonial presence in West Africa in the mid-twentieth century, however, the tradition came … Today the knowledge of some form of English is even more widespread. There are regional dialects such as the Kru Pidgin English used by the Kru 161 likes. Liberian Pidgin English (LPE): In the case of Singler’s (1982) taxonomy Liberian Pidgin English is described as the “least standard-like” or the most highly pidginized variety. Kreyol originated in Liberia among the Settlers, the free English-speaking African Americans from the Southern United States who emigrated to Liberia between 1819 and 1860. Nwanne be proud to speak your pidgin whether it is the simple pidgin or waffi pidgin, that doesn’t stop you from speaking good english when you want to. 5) Copula (forms of “be”) are simplified and often absent (example- “He be my mother”; “He old”). It should also again be noted that these different varieties don’t necessarily infer a lack of fluency in English, as individuals/speakers can be “wholly fluent in each variety” (Singler, 1981, p.19). Language Use. The most formal variety is the Standard Liberian English. Also known as Kolokwa, was spoken by 1,500,000 people as a second language which is about 70% of the population in that time.Today the knowledge of some form of English is even more widespread. Also the copula “de” is used for locational constructions (“He de for work”). "People assume they brought English to Liberia," says linguist John Singler of New York University. Liberian Kreyol (Liberian Pidgin English, Vernacular Liberian English) is an English-based pidgin spoken in Liberia. Liberian English is a term used to refer to the varieties of English spoken in Liberia. The Liberian Pidgin English Telephone Interpreter is responsible for handling calls on demand, and renders the meaning of conversations between Liberian Pidgin English and English speakers. Kreyol (Liberian Pidgin English, Vernacular Liberian English) is an English-based pidgin spoken in Liberia. There are regional dialects such as the Kru Pidgin English used by the Kru fishermen.[4]. Brought to Liberia in 1822 by first group of black American emigrants who settled in Providence Island, now Monravia. These five factors include: In the case of Singler’s (1982) taxonomy Liberian Pidgin English is described as the “least standard-like” or the most highly pidginized variety. Kpelle-Health, Sickness, and Wellness Part 2, Kpelle- History and Brief Intro. There are several varieties of the language spoken in the country including Kru Pidgin English, Liberian Kreyol language, the Merico language, and Caribbean English. Language Status. Arabic: A “Less Commonly Taught” and/or a “Critical” Language? Tips for Finding a Language Mentor for MSA, Phrases and Expressions for Eating and Sharing Food in Levantine Dialect, Learning Gulf Arabic dialects - A collection of resources, Commonly-used expressions / تعبيرات شائعة, Cultural Resources: Arabic-Speaking Countries, Cultural Resources for Learners of Arabic, Online Resources for Arabic Language Learners, Tips for Finding an Arabic Language Mentor During a Pandemic, Online resources for learning Tunisian Colloquial Arabic (TCA), Library resources for Tunisian Colloquial Arabic (TCA), Cultural resources for learners of Tunisian colloquial Arabic, Short (very simplified) Lesson on Questions. Liberian English (lir-lir) = 3 (Wider communication). The Krumen tradition dates back to the end of the eighteenth century. Also known as Kolokwa, was spoken by 1,500,000 people as a second language (1984 census) which is about 70% of the population in that time. It is historically and linguistically related to Merico, a creole spoken in Liberia, but is grammatically distinct from it. [4], https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Liberian_Kreyol_language&oldid=989268343, English-based pidgins and creoles of Africa, All Wikipedia articles written in Liberian English, Short description is different from Wikidata, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 18 November 2020, at 00:43. There are five such varieties: Standard Liberian English or Liberian Settler English ; Kru Pidgin English; Liberian Kreyol language (Vernacular Liberian English) from African American Vernacular English Liberian Kreyol (Liberian Pidgin English, Vernacular Liberian English) is an English-based pidgin spoken in Liberia. Liberian Kreyol language developed from Liberian Interior Pidgin English, the Liberian version of West African Pidgin English, though it has been significantly influenced by Liberian Settler English, itself based on American English, particularly African-American English and Southern American English. Gained usage with five varieties and spread throughout Liberia in the 19th century. Language Development. It is historically and linguistically related to Merico, a creole spoken in Liberia, but is grammatically distinct from it.